Child Counselling

Child Counselling is where children are offered a safe space, an empathetic ear, and help to develop the tools and skills they need to manage their emotions and behaviour in a healthy and positive way.

How does child counselling work?

Child counselling is a form of therapy that is designed to help children deal with emotional, behavioural, and mental health issues. At AMindset, we consider child counselling to be relevant up to the age of 16yrs, after which we are working with adolescents. There will inevitably be some overlap depending on the individual client. Child counselling aims to help children develop coping skills, improve communication, and develop positive self-esteem.

The process of child counselling typically begins with an initial assessment, where the counsellor will meet with the child and their parents or guardians to gather information about the child’s history, current issues, and goals for therapy. The counsellor may also administer assessments or tests to help diagnose any issues that the child may be experiencing.

Once the assessment is complete, the counsellor will work with the child to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to their specific needs. This may involve various forms of therapy, such as play therapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, or family therapy.

The counsellor will work with the child to identify and address any issues that they are experiencing. This may involve talking about their feelings, practising new skills, or engaging in creative activities that help the child express themselves.

The counsellor will work closely with the child’s parents or guardians to provide support and guidance. Parents may be involved in the therapy sessions or receive regular updates from the counsellor on their child’s progress.

Overall, child counselling aims to help children develop the tools and skills they need to manage their emotions and behaviour in a healthy and positive way. Helped by a skilled counsellor, they can learn to navigate difficult situations and build a strong foundation for their future emotional and mental well-being.

What issues can child counselling help?

Child counselling can help with a wide range of emotional, behavioural, and mental health issues that children may experience. Some of the common issues that child counselling can help with include:

Anxiety and stress: Many children struggle with anxiety and stress, which can lead to physical symptoms like headaches, stomachaches, and difficulty sleeping.

Depression:  Children may experience feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and low self-esteem, which can impact their ability to function in daily life.

Behavioural problems: Children may exhibit problematic behaviours such as defiance, aggression, and hyperactivity, which can cause problems at home, school, and in social situations.

Trauma: Children who have experienced traumatic events, such as abuse, neglect, or natural disasters, may benefit from counselling to help them process and cope with their experiences.

Family conflict: Children who are dealing with family conflicts, such as divorce or separation, may benefit from counselling to help them navigate their emotions and develop coping strategies.

Social difficulties: Children who struggle with social skills or have difficulty making friends may benefit from counselling to help them improve their social interactions.

Academic difficulties: Children struggling in school or having difficulty with learning may benefit from counselling to help them develop strategies to improve their academic performance.

What are the benefits of child counselling?

Cognitive Tests

These tests measure a child’s cognitive abilities, such as verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory, and processing speed.

Memory Tests

These tests evaluate a child’s ability to remember and recall information, such as verbal and visual information.

Attention and Executive Function Tests

These tests assess a child’s ability to focus, sustain attention, switch between tasks, and plan and organize their behaviour.

Language Tests

These tests measure a child’s language abilities, including comprehension, expression, and verbal fluency.

Motor and Sensory Tests

These tests evaluate a child’s motor coordination, balance, and sensory processing.

Emotional and Behavioural Tests

These tests assess a child’s emotional and behavioural functioning, including their social skills, mood, and anxiety levels.